What have I missed since July 18th?

It’s been a strange week, starting with farcical scenes of the Murdochs under mild interrogation and ending with tragedy. And it rained a lot. And I was on holiday. And it rained a lot on my holiday.

Local councillor Andrew Marshall has been single-handedly cleaning up the mean streets of South Hampstead. First there was rubbish in Greencroft Gardens, then there were the plans to improve the open land, and finally there was the mysterious case of the oil trailer on Goldhurst Terrace.

There were also reports of overflowing rubbish in Gascony Avenue, and a request has been made for a bin at the junction of Crediton Hill and West End Lane.

West Hampstead’s Beckford school celebrated 125 years with a reunion of pupils from half a century ago.

An alteration/tailoring shop is opening on Finchley Rd roughly opposite the O2 centre.

Estate agents Brian Lack finally closed on West End Lane, to be replaced by Goldschmidt & Howland (as reported here some weeks ago).

The Alice House has applied for longer opening hours: until midnight Mon-Wed & Sun, and until 1am on Thursday.

Camden libraries have a new online borrowing system and e-books have been launched at Swiss Cottage library.

What did we think of the PrioryTavern when we went to roadtest the menu?

A woman was found in a distressed state by garages in Fairhazel Gardens late Saturday night. The police are investigating the circumstances.

On Wednesday a Kilburn Safer Neighbourhood meeting set two priorities: Rowley Way/Abbey estate and anti-social behaviour on the Kingsgate Estate.

On Tuesday, there was a large public meeting about the Abbey estate regeneration plans. Formal plans will be submitted in the next couple of weeks.

Tweet of the Week
Something non-derogatory about Kilburn for once:

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  • It has been a strange week hasn't it – one drama after another, which then paled into insignificance with the tragedies that followed.