Could West Hampstead police station close?

West Hampstead police station looks certain to lose its front counter, but the murmurings that the whole station is under threat are getting louder.

The Metropolitan Police has engaged in a strange consultation process regarding front counter closures. It can, at best, be described as cursory. A cynic might even interpret it as underhand. “Priority stakeholders” were the only people due to be consulted. Andrew Dismore, the London Assembly Member for Barnet & Camden, is one of these people but, for some reason, it took the borough police a week to find his e-mail address to inform him of the consultation. By that time there were only four days left for him to respond. Even if he had received it in time, it still seems a staggeringly short period of consultation. And why was it so hard for the police to find the e-mail address of an elected representative? (Here’s a hint for them next time).

Andrew Dismore

We all know that public services are being cut back far and wide, and the Met is certainly not exempt. The consultation document (which is a strange two-pager that’s heavy on rationale but light on solutions) explains that the force’s budget need to drop by an eye-watering half a billion pounds by 2015. That isn’t just a lot of money, it’s also a huge chunk of 2011/12’s £2.7 billion budget.

There are 136 police front counters across London, although the consultation paper says that more than a quarter have less than one visitor per hour. Fewer than 50 crimes a night are reported at front counters between 11pm and 7am, and 23 of the 24-hour stations see less than one crime reported every three nights. “They are now primarily staffed by police officers, simply waiting for the public to come to them,” says the paper.

The Met is keen to point out that “This is not about reducing our service but expanding, adapting and changing it for a more modern approach.” I do wonder why it’s not possible for those police officers drumming their fingers on the front desk to perhaps be doing something else while they wait, and maybe someone has to ring a doorbell to be let in, so there’s a drop-in service, but the desk doesn’t have to actually be manned permanently. Surely multi-tasking is possible. (I don’t believe for a minute that police officers aren’t already doing something while they sit and wait).

At Mayor’s Question Time this week, Boris came under sustained fire from Assembly Members, notably Labour’s Dismore and the Lib Dems’ Caroline Pidgeon, who said that 1 in 4 rapes were reported at front counters and was it really reasonable to expect people to report these and other serious crimes in coffee shops. For the consensus is that this is Boris’s big idea: relocate police counters to more accessible locations such as shopping centres. This good ITV news report even moots our very own O2 centre as a possible location as well as showing the Mayor’s response to the questions – he accuses Dismore of “fetishising bricks and mortar”, and says that coffee shops are indeed one avenue that might be pursued.

The grand plan foresees the number of locations where the public can contact the police in person rise from 136 today to up to 270 locations in 2015. In total, 65 front counters will be replaced by more than 200 “Contact Points”, of which seven will be in Camden.

Hampstead police station has already been slated for closure and despite a vocal campaign up in NW3 it’s hard to see that it will be reprieved. Although the consultation document doesn’t expressly mention West Hampstead (in fact the only station named is Holborn which will be the borough’s only 24/7 station), Camden police told Dismore directly:

“The proposals under consultation for Camden are for Holborn front counter to remain open 24 hours and for Kentish Town to be open 40 hour per week. Albany Street, Hampstead and West Hampstead front counters will close and we are looking to create 7 Contact Points across the borough to provide alternative access to policing services.”

That seems pretty clear. It would make our nearest public access station Kentish Town, which is hardly convenient. What is still not clear is whether the whole of West Hampstead police station would close, including the 999 response units. As we all know, West Hampstead also has stables for the mounted police, although this division sits outside the borough structure. According to a letter from Camden’s conservative leader Andrew Mennear in the CNJ back in October, the mounted police would stay while the rest of the police station would close and West Hampstead’s police force would be off to Kentish Town. Even the latest draft of the Neighbourhood Development Plan mentions the police station site as a possible development space.

I’m led to understand by Andrew Dismore’s office that the (seemingly blindingly obvious) idea of turning the small Safer Neighbourhood Team base by the tube station into a front counter is not being considered. So where will locals be able to report crime (or hand in lost property)? The O2 shopping centre strikes me as the most obvious place. The SNT already runs stalls there from time to time, and there is designated community space upstairs. It’s hard to think of anywhere on West End Lane unless there could be co-sharing with the library, or with whatever comes to pass at 156 West End Lane (aka the Travis Perkins building). Mill Lane has more vacant spaces, but none of these solutions are to house a response team. Still, we all know that there’s never any traffic between here and Kentish Tow… oh, yes. Right.

Making savings of £500m is always going to lead to some difficult decisions, but efficiency and cost-effectiveness are surely only part of the equation when it comes to providing emergency service cover. In the meantime, Dismore’s changed his Twitter avatar to one that reads 999SOS – a Labour initiative in City Hall and across London to coordinate objections to the scale and speed of cuts to the police and fire services.

How would you feel about the demise of the front counter at West Hampstead? How about the loss of the whole police station?

  • A couple of serving police officers have contacted me to say they don't think response times will suffer if the police station closes.

  • Have any of you ever actually been to the front counter in West Hampstead? I runs very odd hours and (when I last visited about 5 years ago) is manned by a couple of local OAP ladies who appear to be more suited to the WI rather than the Police Force. They had no idea what they were doing (though they were friendly and tried to be helpful). A complete joke and waste of time. I am not sure (other than perhaps for lost property) why one might walk up to the counter. As your own article states, there are many getting very low visit rates – in which case they are a waste of time, resources and money. Go back to the old days of having a blue box with a working telephone in it that gives you access to a real police team.

    (Oh, and next time you pass the station look at how many years out of date the public notice board is outside the station).

    Technology (mobiles, internet etc) has made many of the features of the “counter” redundant.

    As for handing in lost property, the library would be fine – or you can just check Ebay or Gumtree as you are more likely to find it there than at a police station.

    (PS: Perhaps someone can explain what that police building is opposite West Hampstead tube station)?

    • I guess there’s an argument that says that services like the police need to be universally accessible, which means that relying solely on new technology isn’t a good solution.

      Strange about your experience at the front desk there.

      Even if the numbers of crimes reported in person are low, the fact is that some still are – and if Caroline Pigeon is right and 1 in 4 rapes are reported that way it would be interesting to know why that is so high.

      The police building opposite the tube is the Safer Neighbourhood Team base that I referred to. So, it’s an office with basic changing facilities etc. for the WH and FG SNTs. Although it’s never been intended to be open to the public that would seem to be the obvious place for things like handing in lost property, but it would clearly need to be staffed at reasonable hours yet the overhead costs are of course much lower than for an entire police station.

  • I live just a few doors away from the Police station and feel reassured by its presence. But I have never been in to report any crime and have no objections to it closing if it helps save the tax payer £500m. The same is true for the station as a whole: if it is an important part of the the £500m savings, then I guess it would have to go.

  • More details on policing levels across Camden in this follow-up post by Andrew Dismore http://www.andrewdismore.org.uk/home/2012/11/27/special-update-police-cuts-in-barnet-camden/